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Education Plan

Education Plan

Meadow Ridge School Education Plan

Our Education Plan is based on contributions from students, parents, staff, business/community leaders and service providers who provide ongoing and direct feedback in the development of goals and strategies for engagement, support and success of each learner.

Follow Links to:

School Annual Education Results Report 

Meadow Ridge School Website

About Our School


Meadow Ridge School is the newest school in the Foothills School Division opening its door in September 2019.  We currently have approximately 590 students Kindergarten through Grade 9 and are nestled in the north of Okotoks with beautiful views of the Rocky Mountains to the west and a wetland to the north.  As a new school, we co-created our vision and mission before opening our doors:


Empowering the hearts, heads and hands to make a difference.


  • Engaging Others

  • Engaging in Thinking

  • Engaging in Action


                                    We cultivate curiosity, nurture community and grow global citizens.


Meadow Ridge is Home of the Grizzlies of which our mascot was chosen by students in our first year. Like the Grizzly, we are resilient, patient and accepting, adaptive, know when to walk away, continuous learners who live in the present based on lessons from the past, and are courageous enough to be ourselves (Elmeligi & Marriott, 2020).   To develop a safe, caring, welcoming learning environment, we focus on the Meadow Ridge Compass, also referred to as the 3 B’s: helping others feel they BELONG, doing our BEST, and leaving spaces BETTER than the way we found them. 


We have an unwavering belief that:

  • All learners’ have the potential to make a world of difference.

  • Together we are better.  Everyone has strengths and we all have areas to grow. 

  • Continuous improvement is the norm.  We research, innovate and create to make an impact and develop life-long learners.

  • Mistakes and misconceptions are part of the learning process.

  • High expectations are for everyone; people reach the bar we set.

  • Language matters – what we say affects culture.

  • Relationships matter – we are valued and cared about for who we are.

  • Environment matters – students learn better in varied learning environments that are learner centered. Spaces are for them.

  • Feedback matters - learning is a journey of continuous improvement, which requires reflection and action on feedback from others.

  • Thought: when I think of MRS I think of collaboration...where and how can this shine through as part of what is written here?


With 32 certified faculty and 13 support staff including, educational assistants, office staff, a Learning Commons Facilitator, and a Family School Liaison Counselor, we offer a diverse range of learning opportunities within our learning studios, community and outdoors to make our vision live within the Meadow Ridge School community.  Students are invited to attend and/or lead a variety of clubs and extracurricular activities which provides a well-rounded schooling experience focusing on intellectual engagement, health & well-being, positive peer relationships and social emotional development.   To develop the whole child and prepare them for life beyond the walls of schools, we offer a variety of Career and Technology Foundations (CTF), Fine Arts and physical activity opportunities.  This provides students in Grades 5 to 9 the opportunity to explore their interests within various occupational areas and technologies. Through CTF, students may plan, design, create, and implement solutions for relevant problems that exist in our world.  These also include an introduction to construction using power tools, foods, recreation sport, coding and robotics, digital media, band, outdoor education, and drama to name a few .  Kindergarten to Grade 6, CTF focuses on learning through play and Makerspace where students engage in the design thinking process, STEM, robotics, cooking and crafting.   

School Highlights and Celebrations 


While this year has been one of limitations, we have used it as an opportunity to be innovative and creative in how we continue to build our school community, a sense of belonging and identity of what it means to be a Meadow Ridge Grizzly.  We have explored how to teach, learn, and be a school community when we could not always be “together”.  We started the year with a staggered entry allowing faculty to provide a warm, personalized welcome, and provide time for students to adjust to the new protocols related to the School Re-Launch.  We have sought new ways to instruct using various technologies and techniques along with new ways of connecting with our community such as virtual assemblies.  


Celebrations include the ability to pivot through the various scenarios of the phases of Re-Launch, Continuity of Learning, and Renewal all while still in the stages of opening a new school.  While several people had to be isolated due to COVID, there was little to no transmission at the school level.  In each of our AHS inspections, there were few recommendations on how to improve our practices and when there were, we were able to quickly adapt.  We focused on staff and student wellness throughout the year with various activities including a partnership with Julia Schauffler,  a wellness coach from Minds Matter.  We have worked to stay connected to our families through classroom and school communication and engaging students through fun challenges and theme days.  We were able to have our first ever Sports Day for elementary and junior high along with our first Grade 9 Farewell and transition to high school. 


Our word of the year was “Connection” and we focused on health and wellness and (re)connecting our school community.  We wanted to create connections in spite of restrictions of a pandemic.


  1. One highlight was connecting to First Nations perspectives and ways of knowing. In our Grand Opening in September 2019 , Clarence Wolfleg, a Siksika elder, blessed Meadow Ridge School and gifted us with the Blackfoot name Kyityi Tyowaskoo.  We focused our first year around the concept of “story” which included  how the building is tied to the land and reflects nature.  This year, several classes explored the outdoors on our school campus and found ways to honor the land on which our school sits. 



  1. Grade 9 and Grade 1 students collaborated through a Humanities project to create a Meadow Ridge Land Acknowledgement.  One was added each morning to the announcements and read throughout the school.  We will combine their ideas into one which will become an official land acknowledgement recognition within our building.  Some examples:





  1. Several classes, as young as Kindergarten, explored the impact residential schools had on children and families especially once the discovery of 215.  Students demonstrated care, compassion and empathy through these conversations and learning opportunities. 

       


     


  1. Another connection highlight is our Junior High leadership class creating school-wide activities to connect the school as a community.  Using February as “Empower the Heart” month, these students planned Jump Rope for Heart & Stroke, random acts of kindness and Pink Shirt day events.  They planned several spirit days and made a Grizzly Trophy for the class with top participation.  



  1. As part of positive behaviour support, we explored strategies to incorporate positive reinforcement to build a sense of community.  As admin, when we observed students living the vision and the 3 B’s, we took pictures and made it visible on the announcements.  Many students asked to have their picture posted for everyone to see. Teachers noticed a difference when we posted these pictures of expected behaviours.   Our Student Recognition Leadership Team created “Caught In The Act” postcards and gave them to students when they observed expected behaviours.

                                                            

6. We continued to find ways to give back to our community.  We raised over $2300 through Hats On For Charity where we have donated to the Terry Fox Foundation, Heart and Stroke Foundation, Even Start and Heaven Can Wait Animal Rescue.  We also participated in events such as community clean up, writing letters to Grandfriends who live in a local senior residence, starting a recycling club, and Yellow Fish Road. 


Providing Assurance

Our School’s planning and reporting processes reflect the guiding principles, domains and enabling processes outlined in Alberta Education’s Assurance Framework. Our School’s effective planning and results reporting occurs in a continuous improvement cycle which is integral to our accountability and assurance including:

o  Developing/updating plans based on results, contextual information and provincial direction.

o  Incorporating stakeholder input based on engagement activities at various points throughout the process, as appropriate.

o   Implementing research and practice-informed strategies to maintain or improve performance across domains.

o   Monitoring implementation and adjusting efforts as needed.

o   Measuring, analyzing and reporting results.

o   Using results to identify areas for improvement and to develop strategies and targets for the next plan.

o   Communicating and engaging with stakeholders about school plans and results.

Key insights from results analysis of the impact of Engagement, Support and Success strategies

Strengths and Areas for Refinement


ENGAGEMENT

  •  28 parents, 121 students, and 25 teachers completed the February 2020 AERR survey.  We would like to increase the number of parent voices who respond to these questions. 

  • Strengths:

    • 87.5% of participants are in agreement that students are safe at school, are learning the importance of caring for others, are learning respect for others and are treated fairly in school.

    • 89.5% of participants were satisfied with the overall quality of basic education.

    • 77.8% of teachers and parents agree that students are taught attitudes and behaviours that will make them successful at work when they finish school.

  • Areas for growth:

    • 73.6% of participants were satisfied with the opportunity for students to receive a broad program of studies including fine arts, career, technology, and health and physical education.  While PE and music were extremely high, drama was low. 

    • 75.8% of teachers and parents were satisfied with parental involvement in decisions about their child’s education.

    • 61.6% of all participants indicated that their school and schools in their jurisdiction have improved or stayed the same in the last five years.  While this is low, it is difficult to report on improvement when we were in our first year. 

  • While 75% of parents reported there were opportunities for parental involvement, there is a need to enhance opportunities for them to be involved in our community as well as improve consistency of communication to parents.  With restrictions of COVID easing, we hope to involve more parents within the school.

  • Students had different opportunities to provide voice from Student Matters, Grizzly Suggestion Box, Pizza Lunch with admin, visits to learning studios and class based learning opportunities.  We still heard from a minority of Grade 8 and 9 students that we did not respond to student voices. In hopes that all students feel their voice is valued, we need to continue to enhance opportunities to receive, reflect and respond to student voices and engage them as leaders and mentors within the school.

  • Participation at School Council, MRS Fundraising Society and hot lunch was minimal; therefore, we need to explore different ways to recruit and engage parents.  


SUPPORT

  • Most students feel they belong and are cared for which would suggest our “universal” supports we created in year one are having a positive impact on school culture.

  • Many students Gr 4 - 9 indicate low confidence (52%) (low confidence in what? I’m not clear on what this means - is it in their ability to succeed at school?)and internal resiliency (61%) which indicates we need to continue developing what it means to be a Grizzly, how we help others belong, and provide opportunities and strategies to build resiliency.

SUCCESS

  • In core subject areas of ELA, Social Studies, Math, and Science, students report being in “flow” which suggests they are engaged in their learning and find the learning challenging enough to keep them engaged.  

  • Some students do not always understand the relevance of what they are learning according to the SOSQ data and are sometimes bored according to the Intellectual Engagement Survey .  Since many junior high students do not see the utility of school, we need to continue to design meaningful, relevant learning opportunities that support connections to and importance of what they are learning to life beyond school.


Engagement

Engagement that is timely, meaningful and collaborative 

Our story of engagement for each learner at our school


Before opening Meadow Ridge, we invited parents to an engagement evening where they were challenged to rethink the purpose of school and ideated what they hoped their children learned by the time they left Meadow Ridge. This was used when co-creating our shared vision.  Parents also shared communication they would like to see which we incorporated into year two.    This year, the School Council has also been asked for their perspectives around learning and communication which was shared with faculty.  We also asked every Kindergarten parent coming to MRS about what they hope their child learns while at our school.  This continues to guide decisions we make as a school. 


Grade level teams offer more consistency in communications as there was a lot of discrepancy after our first year.  At minimum, every teacher emails a curriculum newsletter the first Friday of every month.  Many teachers also email weekly updates.   Classroom teachers have a commitment to ongoing and timely communication with their families.    Monthly school communication, called Community Connect, is sent out from the office with school information.  Instagram is used as our key social media site to engage parents and students with happenings in MRS.


Our Grade 9 students were engaged in Student Matters and ensuring our students are having a voice. They created a “Grizzly Suggestion Box” outside of the office. Grade 9 students also wrote admin letters in November expressing what they would like for Grade 9 Farewell. This information was used to plan our first farewell.  We also had pizza lunch with a random sampling of Jr High students asking what we could do better as a school.  Admin visited Grade 6 students in May and did a compass point thinking routine getting their suggestions, worries, excitements and need to know for junior high.  We then followed up to answer questions and plan different events to prepare them for junior high.


When hiring for Meadow Ridge, we intentionally chose a variety of teachers with diverse interests, experiences and backgrounds.  This provides multiple perspectives when planning and we have people interested in supporting in many different areas; this is critical when starting a new school and meeting the diverse needs of students.  Therefore, engaging teachers is valued and regularly built into our faculty meetings and professional learning days. We have listened to and responded to teachers’ voices in a variety of ways regarding positive behaviour support, strategies for our Education Plan, implementing guidelines for COVID, the process for year-end transitions and communicating about students as well as leadership teams.  All teaching faculty are part of at least one leadership team: 

  • MRS school traditions

  • school-wide positive behaviour support

  • learning celebrations

  • student leadership/mentorship


Each leadership team used a modified design thinking process to come up with ideas on how we can live our mission and vision.  They created a strategic plan for implementation and timelines to ensure they enacted on at least one idea from their ideation stage.   Engaging faculty in how the school is run, where we focus our time and energy, and providing them with choice/voice, has empowered them to make a difference at MRS.


                                        

**Engaging faculty, both teachers and support staff, in strategies for the Education Plan**


Goal

Desired Result


Advance stakeholder engagement and communications

Advancing stakeholder engagement practices and communication strategies ensures our School is responsive to local needs, increases stakeholder understanding of education matters and improves decision-making. It provides stakeholders and the public with accurate, accessible and easy to understand information about the progress and performance of our School in relation to provincial assurance domains and the Division priority of engagement, support and success  for each learner.

Outcomes 

Measurable statements of what FSD seeks to achieve.


Purposeful and appropriate stakeholder engagement and communication strategies ensure: 

  • stakeholder engagement improves decisions made and provides assurance, trust and confidence in the system. 

  • communication provides assurance.

Indicators

Indicators of achieving outcomes.


  • Measures demonstrate that stakeholders actively participate in engagement opportunities provided by the School. 

  • Stakeholder engagement informed decision making and education plans.

Strategies

Strategies are actions taken to achieve goals and desired outcomes.


Strategy 1: Student Engagement - Continue to develop and build leadership initiatives for students at multiple grade levels such as:

  • recess patrols

  • students offering and  leading clubs related to interests/passions

  • Jr High feedback lunches with admin

  • Grizzly Suggestion box (school); Anything that Matters box (studios)

  • Utilizing CTF classes as leadership opportunities for students to take ownership over school (announcements, advertisements, leadership)


Strategy 2: Faculty Engagement - 

  • Continue to build leadership teams  who develop relevant professional development and ensure responsive support to all staff members and who take ownership and lead school-wide structures and supports such as PBS, traditions, learning celebrations, and mentorship.

  • Continue to use strategies to collect and respond to teacher voice and choice during faculty meetings and professional learning 


Strategy 3: Parent Engagement

  • Continually seek out parent feedback with regards to our school’s direction through: 

    • Bang the Table

    • AERR survey to all parents 

    • Celebrating school council achievements and initiatives.  

  • Increase collaboration with the School Council and Fundraising Society to recruit more parents.


Strategy 4: Community Engagement - Collaborate with and stay in tune with current and future community support systems to provide accurate information to families and staff including:

  • Town of Okotoks

  • Minds Matter


Strategy 5: Communications 

  • Communicate new opportunities via school council, volunteering, and school initiatives through our Instagram and school website

  • Bi-weekly Community Connects that are shorter for parents to read with consistent dates to send out

  • Complete the staff handbook and parent handbook; get feedback and respond accordingly; share with faculty as well as post on website

  • Continue with minimum of monthly curriculum newsletters

Measures and Targets

Provincial and local measures assess progress on achieving outcomes and the effectiveness of strategies implemented.

Provincial

  • Parent Involvement: Increase in percentage of teachers and parents satisfied with parental involvement in decisions about their child's education.

Local

  • Stakeholder Participation Rates: Increase in stakeholder (students, staff, parents & community) participation in a variety of engagement opportunities.

  • Stakeholder Involvement: Evidence of stakeholders (students, staff, parents, community/business) communicating, collaborating, thinking critically, solving problems and having a voice in education planning and decision making.

  • Evidence of Principles and Practices that tell the story of learning and that provides assurance of continuous improvement and student growth and achievement. (i.e. professional learning evidence, classroom evidence and stakeholder voice)

Goal

Desired Result


Advance evidence-based continuous improvement and assurance.

Learners communicate, collaborate and solve problems together to advance education excellence and provide assurance for student growth and achievement. 



Outcomes

Measurable statements of what FSD seeks to achieve.


Assurance has been achieved through:

  • Building relationships.

  • Engaging with education partners and stakeholders.

  • Creating and sustaining a culture of continuous improvement and collective responsibility.


Indicators

Indicators of achieving outcomes.


  • The School's Education Plan and Annual Education Results Report (AERR) represent evidence-informed decision making and continuous improvement.

  • The School’s Education Plan clearly identifies priorities and outcomes to be achieved, measures used to assess progress, and appropriate research and practice-informed strategies implemented to achieve priorities.

  • In the AERR data is analyzed, local and societal context considered, insights developed and conclusions drawn to inform education plans. 

  • The School provides assurance to the government, local stakeholders and the public that they are fulfilling their responsibility for continuous improvement in student growth and achievement through provincial and local measures. 

Strategies

Strategies are actions taken to achieve goals and desired outcomes.



Strategy 1: Continue to share and collaborate with staff to advance the understanding of our school goals to improve student academic and social-emotional growth.


Strategy 2: Use Instagram and Community Connect to highlight events and learning at MRS and highlight explicitly how they align to concepts in the AERR survey and our School Education Plan

Measures and Targets

Provincial and local measures assess progress on achieving outcomes and the effectiveness of strategies implemented.


Provincial

  • Parent Involvement: Increase in percentage of teachers and parents satisfied with parental involvement in decisions about their child's education.

  • Continuous Improvement: Increase in percentage of teachers, parents and students indicating that their school and schools in their jurisdiction have improved or stayed the same the last three years. 

  • Overall Quality of Basic Education: Increase in percentage of teachers, parents and students satisfied with the overall quality of basic education.

Local

  • FSD School Assurance Survey: Increase in percentage of teachers, parents and students satisfied with Assurance Measures.

  • Guiding Principles for Assurance: Evidence that planning and reporting processes reflect the guiding principles, domains and enabling processes outlined in the Assurance Framework. 

  • Evidence of Principles and Practices that tell the story of learning and that provides assurance of continuous improvement and student growth and achievement. (i.e. professional learning evidence, classroom evidence and stakeholder voice)

Assurance Links for ENGAGEMENT

For Further Information Follow Links to:

Example of teacher leadership team’s strategic plan:

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1PGYrC-1KFrW3oOeLRDAo9EGSeY3T1abu_mOXVNqsfMA/edit


Presentation to School Council regarding student voice and choice for options: 

https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1u8RFisxW5LMXDdpVuiBOH11Xa6LnbVaFVwZMzQxYfQI/edit#slide=id.ga4a884da5d_0_226


Engaging School Council in AERR data:

https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/16JOVE_vEAfl0ZNdnmg2eBDYIcH9vPzPE9YHJfDW4Wl4/edit#slide=id.gc07d22f4f3_0_57



Support

Learning environments that are welcoming, caring, respectful, safe and inclusive.

Our story of support for each learner at our school


Meadow Ridge is developing systems, structures and supports that are collaborative, responsive to the needs of students, and aligned with our vision. Our team includes 1.5 FTE Learning Coaches, a Family School Liaison Counselor, a Wellness Coach through Minds Matter, and Education Assistants along with teachers.  We have developed a Continuum of Supports for a safe, caring and welcoming school along with a progressive continuum for expected behaviours; continuum of supports were started for Literacy and Numeracy but are in their?is in its infancy.  As a faculty, we learned about positive behaviour supports as we developed our continuum for expected and unexpected behaviours at Meadow Ridge.  We engaged faculty in its creation along with having a consistent understanding of expected and unexpected behaviours.  To ensure that PBS is a collective responsibility of all faculty, and to get diverse strategies in moving forward, at the end of the school year 2020, we had teachers ideate on administrators', teachers’ and students’ responsibility for positive behaviour (see one example here) at both the classroom-based and whole school level.  At the beginning of Sept 2020, teachers then reviewed the collection of ideas and committed to using at least one new idea/strategya new one in their learning studio. Admin also committed to some such as positive reinforcement (highlighting expected behaviours on the announcements). Here are some examples: https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1AIltVxAUU_VzPe5bFMtB3pseUgv6szfEUWqQE0gy6-4/edit#slide=id.ge00fe71591_44_0


To ensure students get the support required, we make data informed decisions based on benchmark assessments including the Early Years Evaluation - Direct Assessment, Reading Readiness Screening Tool, GRADE, and Math Intervention/Programming Instrument.   Further diagnostic information is gathered through Fountas and Pinnell reading assessments, along with Level B assessments done by the Learning Coach and Level C assessments including therapeutic assessments and Psych Ed assessments.   We also rely on Level A classroom-based assessments and teacher observations.  Grade level teams met weekly to develop a consistent understanding of categorical grades, to examine student learning, and to ensure classroom-based assessments are valid and reliable.  

Every six weeks we have collaborative meetings at each grade level  to discuss students’ academic, social emotional and attendance concerns and celebrate growth. These collaborative meetings include a Learning Coach, administrator and sometimes the Family School Liaison Counselor.  We also have weekly Student Support meetings to discuss student needs and school-wide systems and structures with Learning Coaches, FSLC and admin.   Our Learning Coaches also collaborated with a group of teachers to develop year end transitions based on teacher voice.  Using our operational days at the end of the year, Kindergarten teachers met with Grade 1 teachers to discuss strengths and effective strategies for students. Teachers made notes, asked questions, and now have a bank of strengths-based strategies.  These transition meetings were held from Grade 1 to Grade 8. 


OurWe also have a Wellness Coach, connected to Minds Matter, that started in our school in January.  Ms. Julia began with started with lessons in Junior High and Kindergarten about mindfulness and yoga.  She then worked with Junior High around identifying anxiety and developing coping strategies to cope with it.  She continued then support ined K-6 classes through the PATHS program developingwhich developed social emotional competencies within students.  


Goal

Desired Result


Advance wellness and well-being 

Develop collective efficacy in advancing a culture of wellness and well-being.

Outcomes

Measurable statements of what FSD seeks to achieve.

 

  • Learners contribute to developing and advancing cultures of wellness and well-being.  

  • Learners contribute to and feel welcomed, cared for, respected and safe.

  • Learners access a continuum of support.


“Students will learn

  • to develop a better understanding of themselves that will allow them to make decisions, achieve goals, build resiliency, and adapt to change

  • to build resilience and positive mental health skills for suicide prevention 

  • to know the difference between and how to manage health stress and traumatic stress” 

Guiding Framework - Design and Development of K-12 Provincial Curriculum page 11


“As a pluralistic society, Alberta recognizes and supports unity and a commitment to the common good among a diverse citizenry. A peaceful, pluralistic society and an energized civilization requires respect and mutual understanding among people of different faiths, experiences, and backgrounds.”

Guiding Framework - Design and Development of K-12 Provincial Curriculum page 17

Indicators

Indicators of achieving outcomes.


  • Improved wellness and wellbeing in students and staff .

  • All students and staff demonstrate understanding and respect for the uniqueness of all learners.

  • All learning environments are welcoming, caring, respectful and safe.

  • Learning environments are adapted as necessary to meet learner needs, emphasizing a sense of belonging and high expectations for all. 

  • Improved understanding of an inclusive education system is shared by all education partners.

  • Improved collaboration with education partners to support learning.

  • Improved  wrap around services and supports that enhance conditions required for optimal learning and wellness. 

  • Structures and systems continually improve to support learning and meet the needs of students, families, staff and communities.





Strategies

Strategies are actions taken to achieve goals and desired outcomes


Strategy 1: Collaborate with Minds Matter to design effective and responsive universal supports for staff and student SEL wellness

  • Collaboratively create a design plan and enact it with Wellness Coach and Minds Matter manager that aligns social emotional competencies and Minds Matter schedule of events to ‘what it means to be a Grizzly’ which incorporates voice of students and faculty

  • Internal Resiliency strategies explicitly taught within curricular activities

  • Monitor if these strategies increase internal resiliency and confidence in students as well


Strategy 2: Evidence-Based Practices

  • Continue to build capacity around Positive Behaviour Supports,  Restorative Practice and Trauma-Informed practice with faculty and parents.


Strategy 3: Staff Advisory Council

Our faculty member at staff advisory council will lead team building activities at meetings, create bulletin boards in collaboratories to share wellness information and an area to celebrate colleagues.

Measures and Targets

Provincial and local measures assess progress on achieving outcomes and the effectiveness of strategies implemented.


Provincial

  • Safe & Caring: Increase in the percentage of teachers, parents and students who agree that students are safe at school, are learning the importance of caring for others, are learning respect for others and are treated fairly in school.

Local

  • SOS-Q (Student Orientation to School Questionnaire): Increase in percentage of students who are at or above the National Norm in the areas of Safe and Caring, External Resilience, Internal Resilience, Self-Confidence, Peer Relationships, Utility of School and Extracurricular Activities.

  • Evidence of Principles and Practices that tell the story of learning and that provides assurance of continuous improvement and student growth and achievement. (i.e. professional learning evidence, classroom evidence and stakeholder voice)

Goal

Desired Result


Advance our Continuum of Supports

Continue to develop and advance our continuum of support.

Outcomes


Measurable statements of what FSD seeks to achieve.


FSD maintains a robust continuum of support that is visible and accessible to all learners at the divisional level and within individual schools. 


“A board, as partner in education, has the responsibility to

(e) provide a continuum of supports and services to students that is consistent with the principles of inclusive education.”  

Alberta Education Act, pages 39-40


“To support children and students in attaining the goals as stated in the Ministerial Order on Student Learning,school authorities must ensure that all children and students...have access to meaningful and relevant learning experiences that include appropriate instructional supports.”                    Alberta Guide to Education, Page 27



Indicators

Indicators of achieving outcomes.


Programs, services, strategies and local measures demonstrate that each learner has access to a continuum of supports and services that is consistent with the principles of inclusive learning. 

  • Students and staff demonstrate understanding and respect for the uniqueness of all learners.

  • Learning environments are welcoming, caring, respectful and safe.

  • Learning environments are adapted as necessary to meet learner needs, emphasizing a sense of belonging and high expectations for all. 

  • Education partners fulfill their respective roles with a shared understanding of an inclusive education system.

  • Collaboration with education partners to support student learning and well-being.

  • Wrap around services and supports that enhance conditions required for optimal learning and student well-being. 

  • Structures and systems support learning and meet the needs of students, families, staff and communities.

Strategies

Strategies are actions taken to achieve goals and desired outcomes.


Strategy 1: Build school-based continuum of supports in literacy and numeracy to ensure consistency in universal, targeted and individualized supports and to support teachers, students, and community members use effective strategies/approaches to maximize impact on learning.


Strategy 2: Collaborate with and incorporate the expertise of our school’s FSLC to find relevant outside agencies and support as needed and to connect with families requiring support. 


Strategy 3:  Continue to develop awareness and use of Student Support meetings.





Measures and Targets

Provincial and local measures assess progress on achieving outcomes and the effectiveness of strategies implemented.

Provincial

  • Program Access: Increase in the percentage of teacher, parent and student satisfaction with the accessibility, effectiveness and efficiency of programs and services for students in their community. 

  • Students at Risk: Increase in the percentage of teachers, parents and students agree that programs for children at risk are easy to access and timely.

Local

  • SOS-Q (Student Orientation to School Questionnaire): Increase in percentage of students who are at or above the National Norm in the areas of Safe and Caring, External Resilience, Internal Resilience, Self-Confidence, Peer Relationships, Utility of School and Extracurricular Activities.

Elementary at or above the National Norm for:

  • External Resilience: 58%

  • Internal Resilience: 65%

  • Peers: 66%

  • Safe and Caring: 65%

  • Self-Confidence: 40%

            Secondary at or above the National Norm for:

  • External Resilience: 

  • Internal Resilience:

  • Peers:

  • Safe and Caring:

  • Self-Confidence:

  • Utility of School:

  • Extracurricular: 

  • School Continuum of Supports 

Evidence demonstrates students have access to a continuum of supports to support overall success, achievement and well-being.  

  • School-based Students’ Matters  Engagement 

Evidence from student analysis of information gathered from student generated engagement opportunities created through Students’ Matters.  

  • Evidence of Principles and Practices that tell the story of learning and that provides assurance of continuous improvement and student growth and achievement. (i.e. professional learning evidence, classroom evidence and stakeholder voice)

Assurance Links for SUPPORT

For Further Information Follow Links to 


Link to student essential agreements (code of conduct) & progressive continuum for PBS:  https://drive.google.com/file/d/12WaBXTpBjagD1ikWaZBFlRyegFjaCaJC/view?usp=sharing


Link to Meadow Ridge Compass:  https://docs.google.com/document/d/1MeLeEe7jxSTGVe2illbGmEDN_st9JuoZ/edit


Link to professional learning about positive behaviour supports: 

https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1dHFvFMwQI3M1f9OcFh35b-OBmtMmFNfiB94SRyKVbdU/edit#slide=id.g999f01cf66_0_0


https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1N5ArdNWo3gzc-Um0H1U8UWTpXqmSznz6/edit#slide=id.p11


https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/12mgzYys9OusNWQCLC9fdUYuCJXDX8iMh2VfD_5mEArQ/edit#slide=id.ga08e01f372_0_46


Link to Feedback from Students - What did I learn from Ms. Julia and PATHS?   https://drive.google.com/drive/recent?hl=en_GB


Link to Feedback from Faculty - https://docs.google.com/document/d/1uefzT5oliPbTg7H0dU4jnfSNAfZs6YcnXcDb1ESdsc0/edit?usp=sharing


Examples shared with school council of how we are nurturing our school community:

https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/13syXfQwe3NQmSY2mPtDlqrLYh9W2NvlNSF2rCHD19q4/edit#slide=id.g9e2e88e9ca_0_2



Success

Student Growth and Achievement

Excellence in teaching, learning and leadership

Our story of success for each learner at our school


We deeply believe that all learners can be successful if we meet students where they are at, have strong relationships, and have a strength-based approach to learning.  While we know relationships are critical, we believe learning and relationships are not separate but support one another.  The way we design learning environments and learning opportunities should simultaneously develop strong relationships and positive social emotional competencies.  The two occur in tandem. 


Grade level teams met weekly in HIT (High Impact Team).  At the beginning of the year, we reviewed 5 core practices for formative assessment to develop consistency as a faculty.  Each HIT focused on communicating through writing as related to their Program of Studies (Grade 1 -2 focused on writing words and sentences; Grades 3-9 focused on expository paragraphs).  Each team co-created rubrics aligned to outcomes, had common formative assessments, and then used the calibration protocol to ensure consistent standards for categorical grading. From there, some grades then focused on developing consistent standards for reading, number sense or spelling.   We believe that classroom-based assessments are the most important to monitor student learning and provide next steps; however, to be reliable and valid, we need to ensure we have a consistent understanding of each level of achievement.  This has been the focus of HIT time so we can monitor learning and provide necessary support in an ongoing, timely way.   


As a culture of thinking, we focus on designing learning that is relevant, meaningful and intellectually engaging.  We are moving towards:

  1. Designing learning around a concepts-based approach building off our understanding of UbD and UDL,  starting with concepts, enduring understandings and essential questions.

  2. Using thinking routines to allow students the opportunity to make their thinking visible and to develop their thinking.

  3. Using project-based learning, problem-based learning, design thinking, and/or place-based learning to engage students in learning tasks that empower their hearts, heads, and hands.  Rather than choosing one approach, we encourage teacher voice, choice and creativity.  We understand teachers may use any combination of these throughout the year based on the purpose of learning and learners in their class.  

  4. Using disciplinary literacy in all subjects through reading, writing, listening, speaking and viewing.  For example, we want students to think like mathematicians in math; journalists in LA; authors in LA; geologists in science; environmental scientists in science; historians in social, etc. 

  5. Ensuring that learning extends beyond the walls of our learning studios.  How do we learn in the community around us and how might we bring experts into our learning spaces?


Teachers examined these five criteria and found their own entry point for their IPGP.  Many faculty explored FNMI perspectives and how they relate to designing relevant learning opportunities.  Others focused on designing Cascade Challenges from divisional PD with Garfield Gini-Newman, and creating assessments that were open-ended requiring students to show their thinking.   Some new faculty explored signposts as a way to read for understanding.  Others focused on using formative assessment and feedback to improve learning.    Again, we provided teacher autonomy within the confines of those five criteria of what learning looks like at Meadow Ridge.


We also believe, in order to empower teachers and believe they learn from one another, we designed two professional learning days where they shared one way they were living these goals.  At the beginning of the year, we had Div 1 teachers sharing one thing they did with Div 3 teachers through a sharing circle.  We wanted teachers to get a broader understanding of what learning looks like in K-9, identify what commonalities they may have, and to explore new strategies to try.   Later in the year, every teacher brought a learning task that allowed for deeper thinking.  Collaborating in small groups across division levels, they discussed the purpose of the task, what outcomes were being learned, how it was assessed, and how it aligned with our Ed Plan.  Teachers then asked clarifying questions and provided feedback to one another on ways they might improve it for next time. 


According to our Intellectual Engagement surveys, there were very few students who feel anxious or apathetic in their four core subjects, suggesting we are effective at differentiating for those who require targeted or individualized support and providing multiple chances to improve after receiving feedback.  There was a higher number of students who reported being bored which suggests the need to continue designing learning that is engaging and meaningful for students who have strong knowledge and skills.  Similarly, a high percentage of  junior high students report a low utility of school in the SOSQ, which means they do not understand the connection between what they  are learning and life beyond the walls of school. Overall,  the majority of students do report to being in “flow” in both elementary and junior high students.




Goal 1

Desired Result


Advance innovation and design 

Build on existing high-quality learning in FSD by cultivating a culture of innovation and design to deepen student understanding of knowledge, skills and competencies through robust programs and career exploration that develops life-long learners and active citizens that are prepared for the future.  

Outcomes 

Measurable statements of what FSD seeks to achieve.


“Students will integrate the broad knowledge base of these subjects to learn to think for themselves, solve problems creatively, collaborate, and communicate effectively. Students will be encouraged to approach the world with intellectual curiosity and humility, understanding our inherited traditions, engaging new ideas and diverse viewpoints, questioning assumptions with reason, evaluating sources of information with discernment, and applying their learning in a variety of life and work situations.” AB ED Ministerial Order on Student Learning, p. 2   Innovation occurs when students can transfer what they know to new situations and are empowered to be creative, innovative and think critically.   

Indicators

Indicators of achieving outcomes.


Learners participate in maker-centered, career foundations technology and career technology studies that engage learners in authentic, real-world, experiential, hands-on learning environments and experiences.

 

Strategies

Strategies are actions taken to achieve goals and desired outcomes.


Strategy 1: Offer work summary program for Grade 9 students who require more hands-on experiential learning. 


Strategy 2: Collaborate with Junior High teachers to re-vision CTF courses.  Use the design thinking process to generate ideas and opportunities where students are using CTF courses to make a difference in our school and community. For example, digital arts learn how to create advertisements and then make posters to advertise events and fundraisers at the school; use tech design to create engaging announcements for the school and commercials; construction creates wood art and sell at a market.


Strategy 3: Have a K-6 leadership team to explore the idea of Micro Society and how we could adapt it at our school so students learn financial literacy, marketing, creating products and how to be a contributing member of our community.



Measures and Targets

Provincial and local measures assess progress on achieving outcomes and the effectiveness of strategies implemented.


Provincial

  • Program of Studies: Increase in percentage of teachers, parents and students satisfied with the opportunity for students to receive a broad program of studies including fine arts, career, technology, and health and physical education.

  • Work Preparation: Increase in percentage of teachers and parents who agree that students are taught attitudes and behaviours that will make them successful at work when they finish school.

  • Citizenship: Increase in percentage of teachers, parents and students who are satisfied that students model the characteristics of active citizenship.

Local

  • Student Intellectual Engagement Survey: Increase in percentage of students who chose agree or strongly agree in 50% of questions in Grades 4 -12 in each of the following areas: High Expectations, Relevance, Rigor, Effort, Lose Track of Time (ELA, Math, Social Studies, Science, CTF/CTS.

  • MyBluePrint: Evidence of advancing use of myBlueprint as an ePortfolio and career exploration tool.

  • Learner Profiles: Growth in student achievement in maker-centered learning/CTF/CTS and competency development.

  • Evidence of Principles and Practices that tell the story of learning and that provides assurance of continuous improvement and student growth and achievement. (i.e. professional learning evidence, classroom evidence and stakeholder voice)

Goal 2

Desired Result


Advance learning for transfer

Advance learning for transfer to deepen student thinking and understanding of concepts through learning experiences that can be applied now and in the future for success. 

Outcomes

Measurable statements of what FSD seeks to achieve.


Learners will be able to explore and develop their skills and passions and achieve their highest potential.  


Students will be well prepared for their future while remaining current and relevant in the local and global contexts. 


“Alberta Education supports students in progressing in their learning through open critical debate, becoming lifelong learners inspired to pursue their interests and aspirations, achieve fulfilment and success, and contribute to their communities and the world.” Government of Alberta, Ministry of Education – Business Plan 2020-23, p. 52

“Understanding is about putting pieces of knowledge into logical and meaningful order with other knowledge. Understanding is more complex than knowledge, showing that a student is learning how to organize knowledge to understand a concept. By understanding, one can apply what they have learned to new situations in other contexts.” The Guiding Framework for the Design and Development of Kindergarten to Grade 12 Provincial Curriculum, 2020

Indicators

Indicators of achieving outcomes.


  • Improvement in students’ ability to  apply knowledge, skills and understanding of concepts in a variety of contexts.


  • Improvement in students using ongoing feedback to reflect continuously on progress, identify strengths and areas of need and set new learning goals.


Strategies

Strategies are actions taken to achieve goals and desired outcomes.


Strategy 1: Focusing Professional Learning on Conceptual Understanding in relation to:

  1. Designing learning around a concepts-based approach building off our understanding of UbD and UDL.  Starting with concepts, enduring understandings and essential questions.

  2. Using thinking routines to allow students the opportunity to show their thinking rather than just knowledge and skills.

  3. Using project-based learning, problem-based learning, design thinking, place-based learning tasks to engage students in learning tasks that empower their hearts, heads, and hands.  Rather than choosing one, we provide voice and choice.  We understand that teachers may use any combination of these throughout the year based on the purpose of learning and learners in their class.  

  4. Using disciplinary literacy in all subjects through reading, writing, listening, speaking and viewing.  For example, we want students to think like mathematicians in math; journalists in LA; authors in LA; geologists in Science; environmental scientists in science; historians in Social, etc. 

  5. Ensuring that learning extends beyond the walls of our learning studios.  How do we learn in the community around us and how might we bring experts into our learning spaces?


Strategy 2: Continue to use the High Impact Team model to collaboratively create consistent standards, discuss effective strategies, and use formative assessment to improve student agency.

Measures and Targets

Provincial and local measures assess progress on achieving outcomes and the effectiveness of strategies implemented.


Provincial

  • Overall Quality of Education: Increase in percentage of teachers, parents and students satisfied with the overall quality of basic education.

  • Lifelong Learning: Increase in percentage of teacher and parent satisfaction that students demonstrate the knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary for lifelong learning.

Local

  • Student Intellectual Engagement Survey: Increase in percentage of students who chose agree or strongly agree in 50% of questions in Grades 4 -12 in each of the following areas: High Expectations, Relevance, Rigor, Effort, Lose Track of Time (ELA, Math, Social Studies, Science, CTF/CTS.

  • Teacher plans show evidence of the principles in the Sustained Conceptual Learning For Depth and Transfer Planning Guide.

  • School Professional Learning Plans indicate a focus on the principles in the Sustained Conceptual Learning For Depth and Transfer Planning Guide.

  • Evidence of Principles and Practices that tell the story of learning and that provides assurance of continuous improvement and student growth and achievement. (i.e. professional learning evidence, classroom evidence and stakeholder voice)

Goal 3

Desired Result


Advance First Nations, Métis and Inuit student success

Advance First Nations, Métis and Inuit student success by providing high quality instructional programs and educational services for our Indigenous students and to increase understanding and acceptance of Indigenous cultures for all students, staff, and community. 

Outcomes

Measurable statements of what FSD seeks to achieve.


First Nations, Métis and Inuit learners are successful. 


Strong relationships between students, parents, school, division, Elders, Knowledge Keepers, Cultural Advisors, local leaders and community positively impacts learner success.


Learners advance reconciliation by acquiring and applying foundational knowledge of First Nations, Métis and Inuit experiences. 


“Students will develop an understanding of and respect for the histories, contributions, and perspectives of Indigenous peoples in Alberta and Canada, including Treaty Rights and the importance of reconciliation.” AB ED Ministerial Order on Student Learning, p. 2   

Indicators

Indicators of achieving outcomes.


  • Improved programs, services, and strategies for First Nations, Métis and Inuit student success. 

  • All students, teachers and school leaders learn about First Nations, Métis and Inuit perspectives and experiences, treaties, agreements, and the history and legacy of residential schools. 

  • The FSD Truth and Reconciliation for Learner Success Toolkit supports improved Indigenous student success in the areas of attendance, achievement, high school completion, program options and flexibility, career and academic advising, graduation planning, careers and post-secondary programs.

  • Improvement in First Nation, Metis and Inuit families that are actively involved in educational decisions.

Strategies

Strategies are actions taken to achieve goals and desired outcomes.


Strategy 1: Incorporate ‘student-created’ Land Acknowledgement and blackfoot name into all events and assemblies as well as create signage for the entrance of the school.


Strategy 2: Have faculty experienced in and who have connections with elders be part of the leadership team to find ways to build awareness, understanding of indigenous perspectives into our “What it means to be a Grizzly” plan with Wellness Coach and Minds Matter. 


Strategy 3: Identify students who are First Nations, Metis or Inuit to understand and track where they are in their learning, SEL, and any supports that may be required for academic and/or social emotional success. 




Measures and Targets

Provincial and local measures assess progress on achieving outcomes and the effectiveness of strategies implemented.


Provincial

  • Learning Outcomes (PAT & Diploma):

  • Increase in FSD performance results ‘At or ‘Above’ provincial average for Acceptable Standard and Standard of Excellence on grade 6 and 9 provincial achievement tests in Language Arts, Math, Social Studies and Science for self-identified First Nations, Métis, and Inuit students.

Local

  • RRST (Reading Readiness in English & French): Increase in percentage of students in Kindergarten and Grade 1 who are at or above grade level expectations.

  • GRADE (Literacy Assessment in English): Increase in percentage of students who are at or above grade level expectations in Grades 2 – 9 in the areas of Listening Comprehension, Vocabulary and Written Comprehension.

  • MIPI (Math Assessment in English & French): Increase in percentage of students who scored 50% or more in Grades 2-10 in the areas of Number, Patterns and Relations, Shape and Space, and Statistics and Probability.

  • Evidence of tools, services and strategies that demonstrate advancing FSD First Nations, Métis, and Inuit learner success.

  • Evidence of advancing reconciliation through the Calls to Action as referenced in the Quality Standards for Alberta Educators.

  • Evidence of Principles and Practices that tell the story of learning and that provides assurance of continuous improvement and student growth and achievement. (i.e. professional learning evidence, classroom evidence and stakeholder voice)

Goal 4

Desired Result


Advance literacy and numeracy

Advance literacy and numeracy development for each learner across all subjects and grades for improved student growth, achievement and success.

Outcomes

Measurable statements of what FSD seeks to achieve.


Learners are literate and numerate


Students will have the literacy and numeracy competency to engage in learning across the content areas


“Literacy and numeracy are the foundational building blocks of learning. They shall be pervasive across all subjects and grades and specifically taught using age-appropriate, complete texts of high quality in language classes and standard algorithms in mathematics. These foundations establish core knowledge, shared civic and cultural literacy and skills that enable students to solve problems, think critically as they become active and informed citizens leading healthy lives of meaning.” AB ED Ministerial Order on Student Learning – Foundations for Learning, p. 1

Indicators

Indicators of achieving outcomes.


  • Improvement in students’ ability to understand learning outcomes, demonstrated by strengths in literacy and numeracy, across all subjects and grades.

  • Improvement in students’ knowledge, skills and understanding of foundational literacy, vocabulary, and comprehension (listening and written)

  • Improvement in foundational numeracy and mathematical knowledge and skills for all students

Strategies

Strategies are actions taken to achieve goals and desired outcomes.


Strategy 1: Analyze RRST, F&P, GRADE, MIPI, GLA and classroom level assessment data as a Learning Services Team and larger staff to focus on universal supports, larger school wide themes as well as individual student needs.


Strategy 2: Use HIT time for grade level teams to meet, discuss  and build a continuum of supports for literacy and numeracy.  Start with discussion of what we currently do at the universal, targeted and individualized levels, how we know the impact it has, and reaching consensus of consistent grade-level approaches, academic vocabulary and standards for levels of achievement.



Measures and Targets

Provincial and local measures assess progress on achieving outcomes and the effectiveness of strategies implemented.


Provincial

  • Learning Outcomes (PAT & Diploma):

  • Increase in FSD performance results ‘At or ‘Above’ provincial average for Acceptable Standard and Standard of Excellence on grade 6 and 9 provincial achievement tests in Language Arts, Math, Social Studies and Science.

Local

  • RRST (Reading Readiness in English & French): Increase in percentage of students in kindergarten and grade 1 who are at or above grade level expectations.

  • GRADE (Literacy Assessment in English): Increase in percentage of students who are at or above grade level expectations in grades 2 – 9 in the areas of Listening Comprehension, Vocabulary and Written Comprehension.

  • MIPI (Math Assessment in English & French): Increase in percentage of students who scored 50% or more in grades 2-10 in the areas of Number, Patterns and Relations, Shape and Space, and Statistics and Probability.

  • School Professional Learning Plans indicate a focus on the principles and practices of literacy and numeracy design, instruction and assessment.

  • Evidence of Principles and Practices that tell the story of learning and that provides assurance of continuous improvement and student growth and achievement. (i.e. professional learning evidence, classroom evidence and stakeholder voice)

Goal 5

Desired Result


Advance excellence in teaching, learning and leading that results in improved student growth and achievement.

Outcomes

Measurable statements of what FSD seeks to achieve.


Teachers and leaders continuously improve their professional practice through professional learning opportunities, collaboration, reflective practice and use of a wide-range of evidence to advance teaching, learning and leading.


FSD “maintains high standards for teachers, school leaders, and school authority leaders by ensuring that their preparation and professional growth focus on the competencies needed to help students perform their best, and that effective learning and teaching are achieved through collaborative leadership. Teachers

and leaders are responsible for analyzing the learning context, attending to local and societal considerations, and applying the appropriate knowledge and abilities to make decisions resulting in quality teaching, leading, and learning for all.” Government of Alberta, Ministry of Education – Business Plan 2020-23, p.56


Indicators

Indicators of achieving outcomes.


  • Improved collective efficacy of teachers and leaders responding with skill and competence to the unique learning needs, interests and cultural, social and economic circumstances of all.

  • Teachers and leaders improve their professional practice in design, instruction and assessment through professional learning, collaborative engagement and reflective practice.

  • Teachers and leaders improve their professional practice in learning for transfer.

  • Improved collaboration between teachers, leaders, students and families and other professionals enables optimum learning.

  • Improved use of a range of data and evidence by teachers and leaders to inform cycles of evidence-based continuous learning.

Strategies

Strategies are actions taken to achieve goals and desired outcomes.


Strategy 1: Create a Leadership Team to co-design Professional Learning Days and faculty meetings.


Strategy 2: Distribute leadership by empowering teachers with certain passions and areas of expertise/experiences to  lead learning sessions and/or share success stories from their practice during professional learning and faculty meetings. 

Measures and Targets

Provincial and local measures assess progress on achieving outcomes and the effectiveness of strategies implemented.


Provincial

  • In-service jurisdiction needs: Increase in the percentage of teachers reporting that in the past 3-5 years the professional development and in-servicing received from the school authority has been focused, systematic and contributed significantly to their ongoing professional growth.

Local

  • FSD Professional Learning Survey: Increase in the percentage of teachers who have indicated that their school has started, is consistently doing, or having deeply embedded these practices in 50% of survey questions in the areas of Shared Mission, Vision and Values; Collaborative Culture; Collective Inquiry and Reflective Practice; Commitment to Continuous Improvement and Results and Action Oriented.

  • Evidence of Principles and Practices that tell the story of learning and that provides assurance of continuous improvement and student growth and achievement. (i.e. professional learning evidence, classroom evidence and stakeholder voice)




Assurance Links for SUCCESS

For Further Information Follow Links to


A continuum of supports for nurturing our community - one of the school’s pillars.  We co-created as a faculty and are still in the process of adding targeted and individualized supports while we grow.  This is an example of how space and learning impacts culture and student success.

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1gDagLFwTZosuPE2eRY7j-37K_1XR10Ei/edit


Five core practices for formative assessment (from Leading Impact Teams: Building  A Culture of Efficacy by Bloomberg & Pitchford, 2017).  Reviewed and kept in files for each grade level HIT team.   Example from Grade 1 HIT: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1pQwxRs3AGRTffrEtaGdBg13dp4VA7rax/edit#heading=h.gjdgxs


Example of one HIT success criteria and exemplars for writing:

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1W5shjn9jKYD5HD-xE1ckNRFjqyFfrcpC/edit


Unpacking Thinking Professional Learning:

https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1oafLLxKQSFd4JXrjW8dUbmGH2R5wS4DTle2lDKL_Gxw/edit#slide=id.g9ee67ba675_0_3


Presentation to School Council around authentic, relevant learning experiences at MRS:

https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1xZorY_lCmybYCBd5npvpXm2McZ9jPC3dBhyOHwDQ0M0/edit#slide=id.gc8d77be61c_0_37











To Achieve our Education Plan we focus on 

Engagement, Support and Success for each learner

Our Vision

Engagement, Support and Success 

for Each Learner.


Our Mission

Each Learner entrusted to our care has unique gifts and abilities. It is our mission to find out what these are…Explore them…

Develop them…Celebrate them. 

Our Commitments

for Optimum Student Learning



Our Priorities

Engagement: Ensure and maintain division-wide engagement that is timely, meaningful and collaborative with all learners and communities.

Support: Ensure and maintain division-wide learning environments that are welcoming, caring, respectful, safe and inclusive.

Success: Ensure and maintain division-wide excellence in teaching, learning and leadership.

Engagement 

Support 

Success 

Local and Societal Context 

Learning Supports

Student Growth and Achievement

Assurance Measure: FSD provides trust and confidence that the education system responds proactively to local and societal contexts.

Assurance Measure: FSD provides confidence that resources are managed effectively in establishing learning environments where local and societal context is recognized, diversity is embraced, a sense of belonging is emphasized and all students are welcomed, cared for, respected and safe.

Assurance Measure: FSD provides trust and confidence that students demonstrate citizenship, engage intellectually and grow continuously as learners.

Governance


fsd-logo.png

Teaching and Leading

Assurance Measure: FSD provides trust and confidence that policy leaders demonstrate stewardship of system resources with an emphasis on student success, community, engagement, transparency and accountability.

Assurance Measure: FSD provides trust and confidence that teachers and leaders grow in their professional practice to ensure optimum and continuous learning.




Engagement

Support

Success

Local and Societal Context

Learning Supports

Student Growth and Achievement

Goal 1

Advance stakeholder engagement and communication

Strategic Plan

Stakeholder Engagement and Communications

Goal 1

Advance wellness and well-being


Strategic Plan

Wellness and Well-being

Goal 1

Advance innovation and design

Strategic Plan

Innovation and Design


Goal 2

Advance our continuum of support


Strategic Plan

Continuum of Support

Goal 2

Advance literacy and numeracy


Strategic Plan

Literacy and Numeracy

Vision 2034: Prepared for the Future


https://www11.lunapic.com/editor/working/161229677475490045?2945306126











Goal 3

Advance First Nations, Métis and Inuit student success


Strategic Plan

First Nations, Métis and Inuit student success


Goal 4

Advance learning for transfer


Strategic Plan

Learning for Transfer

Governance

Teaching and Leading

Goal 2

Advance evidence-based continuous improvement and assurance

Strategic Plan

Continuous Improvement and Assurance

Goal 5

Advance excellence in teaching, learning and leading

Strategic Plan

Excellence in teaching, learning and leading



 

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